Fit to Rule: How Royal Illness Changed History - Netflix

Lucy Worsley, chief curator at Historic Royal Palaces, explores how the physical and mental health of our past monarchs has shaped the history of the nation. From Henry VIII to Edward VIII's abdication in 1936, this three-part series re-introduces our past royals not just as powerful potentates, but as human beings, each with their own very personal problems of biology and psychology.

Fit to Rule: How Royal Illness Changed History - Netflix

Type: Documentary

Languages: English

Status: Ended

Runtime: 59 minutes

Premier: 2013-04-08

Fit to Rule: How Royal Illness Changed History - Regency Acts - Netflix

The Regency Acts are Acts of the Parliament of the United Kingdom passed at various times, to provide a regent in the event of the reigning monarch being incapacitated or a minor (under the age of 18). Prior to 1937, Regency Acts were passed only when necessary to deal with a specific situation. In 1937, the Regency Act 1937 made general provision for a regent, and established the office of Counsellor of State, several of whom would act on the monarch's behalf when the monarch was temporarily absent from the realm. This Act forms the main law relating to regency in the United Kingdom today. An example of a pre-1937 Regency Act was the Act of 1811 which allowed George, Prince of Wales to act as regent while his father, King George III, was incapacitated. George ruled as the Prince Regent until his father's death, when he ascended the throne as King George IV.

Fit to Rule: How Royal Illness Changed History - Situations in which the royal functions are transferred to a Regent - Netflix

According to the Regency Acts 1937 to 1953, presently in force, there is provision for the establishment of a regency either on account of the minority of the monarch or of the absolute incapacity of the Sovereign to discharge the Royal Functions.

Fit to Rule: How Royal Illness Changed History - References - Netflix

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