Fishing University - Netflix

Charlie Ingram and Ray Brazier are proud to bring you another fun season of Fishing University, America's original "How to" fishing program. This year is an exciting mix of shows and once again we are using our boat against boat-team competition. Charlie and Ray will each be teamed with a company representative from one of our show sponsors and will square off each week in a tournament like format. Not only is this exciting to watch them battle it out, but you are now receiving information and tricks of the trade from four people who are some of the best in the industry. To add an additional spin, the fishermen are given the same small arsenal of tackle. They have two identical tackle boxes filled with lures of different colors and possibly different sizes. The only catch is that they can only use what is in the box. So no tricks up anyone's sleeves, just pure talent mixed with a little luck.

They have had a great time filming and going all over the country to bring you the best of many different fishing situations. This season they will again be fishing one of the shows from Kayaks! Tune in to see who, if anyone, wound up in the water! We have had a great time getting this years shows ready for you. Our "Back to School" segments have taken us into high schools all over the country, where we have met and had the opportunity to interact with young people who also have a love of the outdoors. You will get to see some of them each week as well.

Fishing University - Netflix

Type: Reality

Languages: English

Status: Running

Runtime: 30 minutes

Premier: 2001-02-07

Fishing University - Fishing - Netflix

Fishing is the activity of trying to catch fish. Fish are normally caught in the wild. Techniques for catching fish include hand gathering, spearing, netting, angling and trapping. “Fishing” may include catching aquatic animals other than fish, such as molluscs, cephalopods, crustaceans, and echinoderms. The term is not normally applied to catching farmed fish, or to aquatic mammals, such as whales where the term whaling is more appropriate. In addition to being caught to be eaten, fish are caught as recreational pastimes. Fishing tournaments are held, and caught fish are sometimes kept as preserved or living trophies. When bioblitzes occur, fish are typically caught, identified, and then released. According to the United Nations FAO statistics, the total number of commercial fishermen and fish farmers is estimated to be 38 million. Fisheries and aquaculture provide direct and indirect employment to over 500 million people in developing countries. In 2005, the worldwide per capita consumption of fish captured from wild fisheries was 14.4 kilograms, with an additional 7.4 kilograms harvested from fish farms.

Fishing University - Recreational fishing - Netflix

Recreational and sport fishing are fishing primarily for pleasure or competition. Recreational fishing has conventions, rules, licensing restrictions and laws that limit the way in which fish may be caught; typically, these prohibit the use of nets and the catching of fish with hooks not in the mouth. The most common form of recreational fishing is done with a rod, reel, line, hooks and any one of a wide range of baits or lures such as artificial flies. The practice of catching or attempting to catch fish with a hook is generally known as angling. In angling, it is sometimes expected or required that fish be returned to the water (catch and release). Recreational or sport fishermen may log their catches or participate in fishing competitions. Big-game fishing is fishing from boats to catch large open-water species such as tuna, sharks, and marlin. Sport fishing (sometimes game fishing) is recreational fishing where the primary reward is the challenge of finding and catching the fish rather than the culinary or financial value of the fish's flesh. Fish sought after include tarpon, sailfish, mackerel and many others.

Fishing University - References - Netflix

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